A Comparison of Measurements on a Dual-Receiver Antenna Range

Authors: Masahiro Tanabe, David S. Fooshe

This paper describes an existing antenna range that uses a unique dual receiver configuration to solve the problem of measuring both conventional microwave antennas and the new digital beam-forming antennas in a single facility. The paper will include a comparison of antenna measurements from tests performed on actual antennas using the two different receivers.

An Algorithm for Automated Phase Center Determination and its Implementation

Author: Pieter N. Betjes

An efficient algorithm for calculating the position of the phase center of an antenna from a measurement is derived and implemented in software. Application of the algorithm to actual measurements shows that the success of the algorithm depends on characteristics of the antenna and a weighing parameter derived from the amplitude pattern.

An Investigation of Adaptive Acquisition Techniques for Planar Near-Field Antenna Measurement

Authors: G. Parsons, D.A. McNamara, D.J. Janse van Rensburg

Reduce Near-Field Data Acquisition Time > Using an Existing Conventional PNF Facility & Operation > Data Acquisition Time (Physical Movement of the Probe) > Work Represents Our Moving in the Direction of Building Feedback/Adaptivity into Near-Field Measurements Dominates Testing Time

You have requested a Reprint of an IEEE-AP-S Paper

Copyright 2007 IEEE. Reprinted from 2007 IEEE AP-S Symposium.

This material is posted here with permission of the IEEE. Such permission of the IEEE does not in any way imply IEEE endorsement of any of NSI-MI Technologies' products or services. Internal or personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution must be obtained from the IEEE by writing to pubs-permissions@ieee.org.

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Design, Alignment, and Calibration Requirements for a Sub-Millimeter Wave Frequency Tiltable Lightweight Scanner

Author: Peter W. Bond, P.E., G. A. Ediss

This paper discusses design aspects related to a tiltable lightweight near-field scanning system for use at submillimeter frequencies. It addresses design issues as they relate to accuracy and scanner distortions from multiple causes. Calibration methods to measure and correct for anticipated and unanticipated errors are briefly addressed. Actual test results are presented.

The tiltable scanner being discussed was designed for the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) [1] and is being used by the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) [2]. It has many other applications by virtue of its light weight (approx. 120 lbs) and ability to be oriented at different angles. These include flightline testing and other in-situ antenna test applications.

EHF Rotman Lens Fed Linear Array Multibeam Planar Near-Field Range Measurements

Authors: Mike Maybell, John Demas

Realized gain measurements of a 44 beam 44 element linear array over a 43.5 to 45.5 GHz design frequency range are presented. The prototype array1 is designed as a single column of a 50 column multibeam 2200 element planar active receive array for geostationary satellite communications payload. The 2200 element planar array is designed to form 1760 simultaneous narrow 0.4 degree beams, 1463 of which intercept the earth. The multibeam single prototype column realized gain was tested at the Nearfield Systems Inc.'s (NSI) facility using a 12’ x 12’ Planar Near-Field Range. Two different linear array configurations were tested. Each configuration utilized the same WR-19 waveguide fed 44 beam, 44 element Rotman lens and integrated RF distribution network (RFD). An active receive array utilizing only the center 8 array elements of the Rotman lens feed was tested first. This was followed by a 44 array element passive array test demonstrating the narrow 0.4 degree half power beamwidth. Summary and specific examples of the NFR test results will be presented. These will be compared with that predicted using the previously measured lens array factor gain (AFG) and embedded element realized gain. The AFG was measured using a HP8510C automatic network analyzer.

Estimation of Radiated Power Density from a Large-scale Phased Array Antenna using FEKO

Authors: Masahiro Tanabe, Yasuharu Masuda

This paper describes the result of analyzing the radiated power density from a large-scale phased array antenna using the FEKO software. In this analysis, we used the Method of Moment (MoM) with the multilevel fast multipole method (MLFMM). Additionally, the result obtained with MLFMM analysis is compared to a measurement result.

You have requested a Reprint of an ACES Paper

Copyright 2007 ACES. Reprinted from 23rd Annual Review of Progress in Applied Computational Electromagnetics, March 19-23, 2006 - Verona, Italy.

This material is posted here with permission of the Applied Computational Electromagnetic Society (ACES). Such permission of the ACES does not in any way imply ACES endorsement of any of NSI-MI Technologies' products or services. Internal or personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution must be obtained from the ESA.

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Fast and Accurate Antenna Alignment Correction Performed Using a Vector Isometric Rotation

Authors: Stuart F. Gregson, Clive G. Parini, John McCormick

The success of most traditional implementations of antenna measurement techniques whether near field, far field or compact, assume that a fiducial mechanical datum associated with the antenna under test (AUT) can be accurately and precisely aligned to the mechanical axes of the test range. Unfortunately, an alternative approach is sometimes necessary, as achieving such careful alignment is not always convenient or possible. Instead, if the relationship between the frame of reference associated with the antenna and the frame of reference associate with the range can be acquired, i.e. assuming that it is known, then in principal any misalignment can be corrected for within the data processing chain. Techniques for rigorously implementing the necessary vector isometric rotation are well documented and usually utilise the concepts of a modal expansion. In general this is not always convenient as these methods can be difficult to implement and often require the transformation of one modal expansion to another, e.g. planar or cylindrical to spherical, etc.. This paper describes the additional post processing that is required to yield alignment corrected far field data from an acquisition of an imperfectly aligned antenna. A general-purpose vector isometric rotation strategy is utilised that is reliant upon interpolation, rather than a particular modal expansion. The interpolation is performed using a polar, i.e. amplitude and phase, implementation of a two dimensional bi-cubic convolution interpolation algorithm. The effectiveness of this technique is then demonstrated through the use of range measurements.

You have requested a Reprint of an LAPC Paper

Copyright 2007 LAPC. Reprinted from Loughborough Antennas and Propagation Confererence, 2007.

This material is posted here with permission of the LAPC. Such permission of the LAPC does not in any way imply LAPC endorsement of any of NSI-MI Technologies' products or services. Internal or personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution must be obtained from the LAPC.

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